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Dream interpreter helps people realize their potential
by Krystal Bick
Nov 29, 2008 | 1468 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Tribune/Nathan Orme- Dream interpreter, Doug Addison, reads a passage from the Bible while teaching a dream interpreation seminar at John Ascuaga's Nugget. Addison believes that "night dreams point us to our life dreams."
Tribune/Nathan Orme- Dream interpreter, Doug Addison, reads a passage from the Bible while teaching a dream interpreation seminar at John Ascuaga's Nugget. Addison believes that "night dreams point us to our life dreams."
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Tribune/Nathan Orme- Doug Addison addresses an audience, teaching his dream interpretation seminar at John Ascuaga's Nugget.
Tribune/Nathan Orme- Doug Addison addresses an audience, teaching his dream interpretation seminar at John Ascuaga's Nugget.
slideshow
For several years, Doug Addison had a reoccurring dream that he was being chased. Such dreams are common, except what set Addison’s apart was that he finally turned around in his dream, to face whatever it was.

“I saw a blinding white light,” said Addison, a dream interpreter and motivational speaker. “I realized then it was my destiny to help people study their dreams.”

And on Saturday, Addison, the author of several books and dream interpretation manuals, was at John Ascuaga’s Nugget Casino for the weekly meeting of the Reno Outpouring put on by the River Rock Christian Fellowship church.

Addison, who has lived all over the country and can mimic the accents to prove it, still lives his Southern California roots. His vibe is laid back, hair slightly tousled and wearing Quiksilver brand clothing. He laughed a little while reflecting back on his early start in dream interpretation.

“I was actually diagnosed with Huntington’s disease back in 2001,” Addison said, explaining that the often fatal neurological disorder shortened his life expectancy greatly. “After I was diagnosed, I went to an outpouring meeting, much like this one, and since then, I was healed of all symptoms.”

Since then, Addison has been trying to make people laugh — one of his lifelong dreams.

“I believe our night dreams point us toward our life dreams,” Addison said. “And sometimes when you see something negative, you just have to flip it around and make it positive. You can even take a nightmare and flip it around.”

Having interpreted nearly 18,000 dreams since he began, Addison has made his rounds from religious meetings to business seminars, training people to interpret their dreams in quick, easy steps.

“People are so hungry for this,” Addison said, explaining that his methods are so simple, a child can easily follow and probably pick it up faster than an adult. “I want to help people find their destiny.”

Pointing out that people everywhere are dreaming, Addison said he is a firm believer that people just need to reconnect with their creative sides.

“People are busy these days,” Addison said, mentioning that he notices the same reoccurring dreams most everywhere: flying, falling, being chased and running. “We’re losing track of our purpose. We just need to realize that we dream all time. And it’s very symbolic.”

Addison, who is considered a master level dream interpreter, said the key to interpreting dreams is to keep your focus simple.

“Less is more,” Addison said, explaining that people need to look for at least three main ideas in their dreams. “You want to get to the core of the dream.”

Next, Addison said to make sure to always have a pencil and notepad at your bedside before going to sleep, to jot down dreams when they occur.

“Or even talking to someone about it the next day will help you remember,” Addison added.

For people who don’t remember any of their dreams when they wake up, Addison said much of the block is mental.

“Everyone is wired differently,” Addison said. “But if you go to bed knowing that you want to remember your dream, eventually you’ll get in the habit of it.”

Eric Moen, the pastor of the River Rock church, said Addison’s approach to dream interpretation is more “free form” than the interpretation he learned while earning his master’s degree in clinical psychology from Missouri State.

“Certain schools of dream interpretation can go overboard and get so in depth that they overanalyze and get it wrong,” Moen said. “(Addison’s approach is) good for me because I don’t want to be a dream expert but I like being able to talk to people about their dreams.”

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