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Making life easier
by Garrett Valenzuela
Oct 20, 2012 | 3655 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Tribune photo/Garrett Valenzuela -- Bruce Breslow, director of the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles in the Governor's Cabinet, reads to a class of first and second grade students Friday morning at Lincoln Park Elementary School.
Tribune photo/Garrett Valenzuela -- Bruce Breslow, director of the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles in the Governor's Cabinet, reads to a class of first and second grade students Friday morning at Lincoln Park Elementary School.
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SPARKS -- Bruce Breslow was given the VIP treatment at Lincoln Park Elementary School Friday when he arrived for Cabinet Reading Day where he shared a fictional story set in a Nevada ghost town.

Breslow, director of the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles in the Governor’s Cabinet, greeted first and second-grade children in Dede Bradshaw’s class and intrigued the students with his personal background. Breslow, who is also a former mayor of Sparks, told the children of his ventures outside government circles when he was a sports broadcaster for the local Channel 8 news station.

Breslow told the children how being a broadcaster taught him “how to get along with everybody” and stressed to the children the importance of reading, even when it seems a dispensable skill at the time.

“We don’t always realize the importance of reading because it is not the most exciting thing for these children,” Breslow said, “But if we can show them there is a benefit, it will make life easier for them. I seem to find that is an important message to share because as you make your way up to higher classes and you get stuck, it makes it very hard to learn because it takes too long to read.”

Breslow read “Tomás and the Ghost Town” to the class, a spooky story written by longtime Nevadan Mike Miller whose Tomás the Tortoise adventure books feature a desert tortoise from the Red Rock Canyon. In Breslow’s reading, the tortoise travels to Rhyolite, Nev. to explore the abandoned town.

The students interacted with Breslow during the reading as he quizzed them on animals, complicated words and facts about Nevada. He said the class was not only enjoyable, but showed plenty of promise.

“That was an extraordinary class. They were all curious and had amazing imaginations,” he said. “Whoever their parents are, and their teachers, should be proud. They are really positioned to do well and they have a great chance to grow in this school. A great imagination can really take you a long way in life.”

Breslow closed out his time with the first and second grade students by handing out coins originated from a Nevada mint, which featured Gov. Brian Sandoval imprints. Breslow was then taken on a tour of the school by the Sixth Grade Ambassadors, a first-time program at Lincoln Park Elementary designed to give student leaders opportunities to hone their skills.

“Some of the programs they have at this school I was not aware we had in this country,” Breslow said. “These kids have a chance to really go far.”

Breslow had the chance to interact with several more classrooms and teachers before departing the school. He said the ultimate message he hoped to instill Friday was that reading is a gateway in life.

“I wanted to show them (reading) is fun, you learn something when you do it and the more you do it, the easier it gets,” he said. “It can make so many things in life easier and I hope these kids took that away from my visit today.”
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