Check Out Our Sports Photo Galleries Contact Us
Artist’s creative pursuits represent spectrum of passions
by Jessica Garcia
Jul 24, 2008 | 955 views | 0 0 comments | 23 23 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Tribune/Krystal Bick
Vanessa Aramanda, owner of All Nessy's Friends temporary tattoo and face painting business, paints a white kitty on three year old Avalin McCombs' face.  All Nessy's Friends can be found out at the Sparks Hometowne Farmer's Market on Thursdays.
Tribune/Krystal Bick Vanessa Aramanda, owner of All Nessy's Friends temporary tattoo and face painting business, paints a white kitty on three year old Avalin McCombs' face. All Nessy's Friends can be found out at the Sparks Hometowne Farmer's Market on Thursdays.
slideshow
Vanessa Aramanda calls herself “ADD” for attention deficit disorder, but perhaps the word more appropriate for her wide array of artistic interests is “eclectic.”

It’s a trait that works for her as a vendor at the Sparks Hometowne Farmer’s Market every Thursday during the summer. At her two booths, manned by herself and her daughters, she uses her talent to paint on kids’ faces whatever design they request, whether it’s a dragon, a line of stars or a swirl of colors.

At other times, Aramanda, a Sparks resident, makes toys, paints murals on walls in residents’ houses, creates stained glass images and shapes balloon animals and designs, providing joy for children, adults and herself.

“Art makes you think abstractly,” she said. “It makes you think outside the box.”

The dilemma is she can’t settle down with just one medium; she makes a full-time career doing them all. It’s a career that provides her with many opportunities, especially when it comes to helping the city of Sparks, for which she serves as an entertainment coordinator

“My biggest problem is I do a lot of things well,” she said. “I need to decide what to give up!”

Aramanda, a happily married wife and the proud mother of three daughters, one of whom is an art major at the University of Nevada, Reno, owns a two-sided business under one license. With All Nessy’s Friends, she creates magic, temporary tattos, henna, hair beading and occasionally provides clowns or performs as a clown herself.

At farmer’s markets, she charges $3 to $8 for a child’s face-painting, depending on the complexity of the youth’s request. She paints colorful butterflies, stars, dragons, dolphins or nearly anything the kids request. She uses kryolan, a type of theatrical paint that costs a little more but lasts longer and adds more color than other types of paint.

Home murals, in which she has created themes including Strawberry Shortcake for girls and Tuscan dining rooms with vines and grapes, start at $200.

The glass part of her business, called Glass Fantasy, produces stained glass pieces and windows for churches or other clients, which can cost between $150 to $200, depending on square footage. She also has made sandblast etchings of celebrities, including Humphrey Bogart and Tina Turner.

She combines the two parts of her business when she paints on business windows for clients like Papa Murphy’s Pizza.

“The craft gets me around people and out of the house,” she said. “Working at home by yourself can get lonely.”

The artist who once did pastel portraits at Disneyland with one of her sisters now works to provide clowns and artists for birthday parties, company luncheons or other special events. She said many of the local artists she coordinates with work for “really reduced rates” just for the love of their craft.

“It’s great to make a living doing something you like, where you can carve a niche out of it,” Aramanda said.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
Featured Businesses