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Where are the jobs?
by Garrett Valenzuela
Aug 17, 2012 | 2949 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Tribune/John Byrne
(Above) Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.) motions to the crowd Thursday during his campaign rally at Mambo’s Nightclub in Reno. Heller received chants of ‘Where are the jobs’ from the crowd in response to his remarks on the Obama administration.
(Below) Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) speaks in support of Sen. Heller and the importance of bringing a Republican majority to the United States Senate.
Tribune/John Byrne (Above) Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.) motions to the crowd Thursday during his campaign rally at Mambo’s Nightclub in Reno. Heller received chants of ‘Where are the jobs’ from the crowd in response to his remarks on the Obama administration. (Below) Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) speaks in support of Sen. Heller and the importance of bringing a Republican majority to the United States Senate.
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RENO — Dean Heller couldn’t help but think of Bob Hope and Johnny Cash when he was making his way to Mambo’s Nightclub for Thursday afternoon’s election campaign rally. He made a link to President Barack Obama when he began speaking, saying “Obama has no cash and no hope.”

Heller brought members of the crowd to a chanting unison when he turned their attention to his four-word campaign focus, “Where are the jobs?” Heller said the Obama administration has spent a trillion dollars to lower the unemployment rate, then motioned to the crowd with the microphone to hear them chant the four words back to him.

Heller received the response three more times when bringing up Obama’s decisions such as a bailout of the auto industry, the enactment of Obamacare and the Wall Street bailout.

Heller, a republican member of the U.S. Senate, is in the midst of a re-election bid against southern Nevada Congresswoman Shelley Berkley. He was in Reno stumping for support a day after Berkley was in the Truckee Meadows doing the same.

Heller sent Thursday’s crowd rushing toward the stage with their camera phones as he introduced Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.).

“When you look at what is at stake here you will not just decide who the next senator will be and if they are a Republican or Democrat, you will be deciding who holds the majority in the United States Senate,” Rubio said about traveling to Nevada to support Heller. “We cannot have a majority in the Senate if Dean Heller is not elected to the Senate.”

Rubio then told the story of the seven years he spent living in Las Vegas while his father worked as a bartender and his mother as a hotel maid. He said their intention was to provide he and his siblings with opportunities they were never given.

“They were never rich, but they lived the American dream because they gave us a chance to do all of the things they never had a chance to do,” he said, “Because all of the doors that were closed to them are now open for us.”

Rubio, with Heller at his right on stage, did receive some distant boos from the crowd when he moved to the subject of 2008’s presidential election. He said President Obama’s promises that year have proven empty and were the leading cause to keeping the country in a poverty stricken state.

“I think all of us know people who voted for Barack Obama in 2008 because he was new and he was different and was going to give us a different type of politics. There is nothing new about his ideas. His ideas are the same ones that have kept people in poverty for centuries,” Rubio said. “I remember Obama saying to put behind childish things like negative campaigning; those days are long gone.”

Congressman Mark Amodei was also on hand to support Sen. Heller, speaking mostly to the issues involving Medicare. He said the current administration has been hurting Medicare by siphoning funds to support Obamacare.

“When you make cuts to those people called providers, doctors and hospitals; that’s called access,” he said “There is nothing more disingenuous to the people that were on that program than saying congratulations, you’ve got a program, but good luck finding someone who will take it.”

He followed up by saying it was “disrespectful” to voters to “say he was going to make changes.”

State Senate candidate Greg Brower and State Assembly candidate David Espinosa were also on hand to support Heller. Brower noted the importance of the Republican voice when the polls open for early voting in 68 days, saying the “Democrats have a stranglehold on the legislative process in Carson City. If you want education reform, good luck with Democratic control.”
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