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Pirates of the ‘Cure’ibbean
by Jessica Carner
Oct 08, 2011 | 1528 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Courtesy Photo/Northern Nevada JDRF
In previous years, participants of the annual Walk to Cure Diabetes have gathered on the quad at UNR.
Courtesy Photo/Northern Nevada JDRF In previous years, participants of the annual Walk to Cure Diabetes have gathered on the quad at UNR.
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Courtesy Photo/Northern Nevada JDRF
Ali and Taylor show off their pirate costumes for this year’s JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes. The 2011 event theme is Pirates of the ‘Cure’ibbean.
Courtesy Photo/Northern Nevada JDRF Ali and Taylor show off their pirate costumes for this year’s JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes. The 2011 event theme is Pirates of the ‘Cure’ibbean.
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RENO ­— Get out yer sword and yer pirate gear because it is time once again for the annual Northern Nevada Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Walk to Cure Diabetes.

The 8K walk this year has a pirate theme and will be held at the University of Nevada, Reno at 10 a.m. Sunday. Registration begins at 9 a.m. in front of the UNR Knowledge Center.

Teams have already formed and have been raising money for JDRF for several months, but it is not too late to register as a team or as an individual walker. Those interested in walking, raising money or making a donation can visit walk.jdrf.org, call 786-1881 or show up Sunday morning and register on site.

“Just approach the registration table in front of the Knowledge Center,” said Julie Malkin, JDRF special events manager. “There is no registration fee. We just encourage people to raise at least $100.”

Walkers who raise at least $100 for the JDRF will receive a T-shirt.

“When you check in at registration to turn in your donations, you’ll get your T-shirt ticket,” a JDRF newsletter states. “You can pick up your 2011 walk T-shirt right next to registration, either before or after the walk.”

Even people who are getting a late start can raise their $100, Malkin said.

“Ask 10 people for $10 (donations) or 20 people for $5,” she said.

Even if walkers do not have all their donations in by Sunday, the JDRF will still accept money after the walk is over.

“If they want to go out and raise money on their own after the walk, we are always accepting donations,” Malkin said.

During the walk, Starbucks coffee and refreshments will be available. Afterward, lunch will be provided free of charge from Jack in the Box, Qdoba and Round Table Pizza. The event is stroller- and dog-friendly, but dogs must be on a leash and owners are responsible for cleaning up after their pets.

Participants are encouraged to wear their best pirate costumes and to partake in a smorgasbord of swashbuckling activities, such as learning to talk like a pirate, a “getting your sea legs” class, a sword fighting class, temporary pirate tattoos and face painting.

The walk’s corporate chairman, Dennis Banks of Dennis Banks Construction, will get the walk started with a ribbon cutting at 10 a.m. Those who wish to arrive early and participate in a jazzercise warm-up session should arrive by 9:30 a.m.

“The walk will take place rain or shine,” the newsletter states.

Funds from the walk will go to the JDRF to help find a cure for juvenile diabetes, or type 1 diabetes.

According to jdrf.org, type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that affects the body’s ability to protect itself from viruses and bacteria. The condition strikes children and adults suddenly and lasts a lifetime. More than 8 percent of the U.S. population has diabetes and it is one of the costliest chronic diseases, accounting for 32 percent of all Medicare expenditures.

While insulin therapy can alleviate symptoms of the disease and help people with diabetes live fairly normal lives, it is not a cure and will not prevent kidney failure, blindness, nerve damage, amputation, heart attack, stroke and pregnancy complications.

Since its inception in 1970, JDRF has funded more than $1.5 billion in research for immune therapies, beta cell therapies, glucose control and complications therapies. In northern Nevada, more than $8 million has been raised for JDRF.
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