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Leaving his legacy
by Garrett Valenzuela
Jan 16, 2013 | 2450 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Anthony Tiscareno
Anthony Tiscareno
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SPARKS — It may be the military. It may be law enforcement. One way or another Anthony Tiscareno knows he wants to be a defender. Having a grandfather and uncle who served in the U.S. Navy has always piqued Tiscareno’s interest in serving for a higher purpose.

The 17-year-old senior at Spanish Springs High School is a semester away from accepting his diploma and beginning his study of the criminal justice world. He said the passion for giving back and helping others is something he lives by daily.

“I just have always wanted to defend something for a purpose,” Tiscareno said. “I can go out and I can go for a walk in any state in this country and not have anybody bother me, but there are other places where people cannot go out and enjoy the nature that they have. That is something that would be cool to defend.”

Tiscareno is currently managing his full class schedule and prepping for his fourth and final year on the Cougar baseball team. The left-handed pitcher said the lessons he has learned through his years spent on the diamond are ones that will carry him through his career in law enforcement.

“The thing that I noticed most is that playing baseball has definitely made me mentally stronger,” he said. “It is a super mental sport. The physical capability isn’t that stressful, but as far as mental stuff goes I can pretty much hold my own in any situation and I can keep under control. That is something I look forward too also; I can be under a stressful situation and still perform to the best of my abilities.”

Tiscareno is currently participating in a first-year mentoring program at Spanish Springs High which allows him to associate with and help out freshman students. He said much of the program is breaking the stereotype of senior students belittling freshman and then ensuring those freshman have an ally roaming the halls.

“We get to organize events for the freshman and I get to put in ideas for next year. Even though I am not going to be here, I still want to leave a legacy behind,” Tiscareno said. “I give them some high school lessons and advice that I have learned. It goes down to building a relationship with them too so they don’t see the seniors as harassing them. And it gets down to a personal level too where they will ask about problems in their personal lives. That is something that has helped me a lot and I think it will benefit me in the future.”

Tiscareno said his time spent at Summit Christian Church in Sparks has given a fallback career as a youth pastor if law enforcement does not work out. He said having the chance to work with children and help transform their lives would feed on the joy he currently finds in helping people.

“Our youth pastor told us that what inspired him to become a youth pastor was he looked at a stat in college that said over 90 percent of teenagers lose their faith after high school. It really hit me that night and it is still the same inspiration I have today,” Tiscareno said. “I see how much I help people when I try to help them and I get encouragement from a lot of people telling me I helped them so that really drives me. Helping them helps me.”

Tiscareno said he is strongly considering entering Truckee Meadows Community College in the fall when he returns from Kenya where he will help teach a vacation bible school for children. In the meantime, he said he enjoys fishing, hunting and “any kind of reckless teen sport,” such as riding quads in the mud.

Still, Tiscareno said his legacy is the most important thing for him to define and leave behind throughout his life.

“I was asked just a couple of days ago what I wanted my legacy to be, and I really want my legacy, no matter where I am, to be the person or man who never let anyone go unnoticed,” he said.
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